Quake Gets New Accessibility Options and Maps 26 Years After Launch


An update for Quake has added new accessibility options and maps 26 years after it was first released.

As revealed on the Steam announcements page, Quake now lets players change its menu style to a plain black and white format instead of just having stylised letters appear over the game.

Other sight-focused features include adjustable screen flash intensity, on-screen message duration times, an increase in the maximum number of messages appearing on the HUD, and adjustable display durations of multiplayer text messages.

The update also brings a chat-to-voice converter to Quake. Players can now turn incoming multiplayer text chat into a synthesized voice, or convert incoming voice chat to text. The opposite is also possible, as messages the player sends can also be converted into a voice, with multiple styles available.

Outside of the new accessibility options, three horde maps have been added to Quake alongside several balance adjustments to the mode, including improvements to bot AI.

The PC classic, still making headlines despite being more than a quarter of a century old, will naturally be a core feature of QuakeCon. Organisers announced last week that the yearly celebration of id Software games like Quake and Doom would be a digital event again this year.

While it's mostly a chance for fans to meet and greet, last year's event also revealed new information about Deathloop, Fallout 76, and Elder Scrolls Online, while The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Anniversary Edition was also announced for PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series.

Ryan Dinsdale is an IGN freelancer who occasionally remembers to tweet @thelastdinsdale. He'll talk about The Witcher all day.